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FFP2 Face Mask

FFP2 Face Mask

$2.50

  • Meets FFP2(EN 149-2001) standard (similar to NIOSH-approved N95)
  • Filters out at least 95% of particles in the air (up to 0.3 micron in size)
  • Made of non-woven fabric with outer electrostatic filter cotton
  • No exhalation valve to maintain a sterile environment
  • Two-strap elastic straps with welded dual point attachments
  • Adjustable aluminum nose piece
  • Lightweight construction

Profit from the sales will go towards purchasing more Respirators that will be donated to Local Charities

Approximate ship date from our Tampa, Florida location:

1-2 business days

NO REFUNDS OR RETURNS ON THIS PRODUCT

In stock

SKU: FFP2 Category:
000
  • Meets FFP2(EN 149-2001) standard (similar to NIOSH-approved N95)
  • Filters out at least 95% of particles in the air (up to 0.3 micron in size)
  • Made of non-woven fabric with outer electrostatic filter cotton
  • No exhalation valve to maintain a sterile environment
  • Two-strap elastic straps with welded dual point attachments
  • Adjustable aluminum nose piece
  • Lightweight construction

Profit from the sales will go towards purchasing more Respirators that will be donated to Local Charities

Approximate ship date from our Tampa, Florida location:

1-2 business days

NO REFUNDS OR RETURNS ON THIS PRODUCT

Additional information

Quantity

1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100

Frequently Asked Questions about Respirators

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/respirator-use-faq.html

What is a respirator?
A respirator is a personal protective device that is worn on the face or head and covers at least the nose and mouth. A respirator is used to reduce the wearer’s risk of inhaling hazardous airborne particles (including infectious agents), gases or vapors. Respirators, including those intended for use in healthcare settings, are certified by the CDC/NIOSH.

What is an N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR)?
An N95 FFR is a type of respirator which removes particles from the air that are breathed through it. These respirators filter out at least 95% of very small (0.3 micron) particles. N95 FFRs are capable of filtering out all types of particles, including bacteria and viruses.

What makes N95 respirators different from facemasks (sometimes called a surgical mask)?
Click for Infographic: Understanding the difference between surgical masks and N95 respirators

N95 respirators reduce the wearer’s exposure to airborne particles, from small particle aerosols to large droplets. N95 respirators are tight-fitting respirators that filter out at least 95% of particles in the air, including large and small particles.

Not everyone is able to wear a respirator due to medical conditions that may be made worse when breathing through a respirator. Before using a respirator or getting fit-tested, workers must have a medical evaluation to make sure that they are able to wear a respirator safely.
Achieving an adequate seal to the face is essential. United States regulations require that workers undergo an annual fit test and conduct a user seal check each time the respirator is used. Workers must pass a fit test to confirm a proper seal before using a respirator in the workplace.

When properly fitted and worn, minimal leakage occurs around edges of the respirator when the user inhales. This means almost all of the air is directed through the filter media.

Unlike NIOSH-approved N95s, facemasks are loose-fitting and provide only barrier protection against droplets, including large respiratory particles. No fit testing or seal check is necessary with facemasks. Most facemasks do not effectively filter small particles from the air and do not prevent leakage around the edge of the mask when the user inhales.

The role of facemasks is for patient source control, to prevent contamination of the surrounding area when a person coughs or sneezes.  Patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 should wear a facemask until they are isolated in a hospital or at home. The patient does not need to wear a facemask while isolated.

My employees complain that Surgical N95 respirators are hot and uncomfortable – what can I do?
The requirements for surgical N95 respirators that make them resistant to high velocity streams of body fluids and help protect the sterile field can result in a design that has a higher breathing resistance (makes it more difficult to breath) than a typical N95 respirator. Also, surgical N95 respirators are designed without exhalation valves which are sometimes perceived as warmer inside the mask than typical N95 respirators. If you are receiving complaints, you may consider having employees who are not doing surgery, not working in a sterile field, or not potentially exposed to high velocity streams of body fluids wear a standard N95 with an exhalation valve.

My N95 respirator has an exhalation valve, is that okay?
An N95 respirator with an exhalation valve does provide the same level of protection to the wearer as one that does not have a valve. The presence of an exhalation valve reduces exhalation resistance, which makes it easier to breathe (exhale). Some users feel that a respirator with an exhalation valve keeps the face cooler and reduces moisture build up inside the facepiece. However, respirators with exhalation valves should not be used in situations where a sterile field must be maintained (e.g., during an invasive procedure in an operating or procedure room) because the exhalation valve allows unfiltered exhaled air to escape into the sterile field.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Costa Industries makes no representations or warranties either express or implied, regarding the suitability of the material for any purpose or the accuracy of the information. Accordingly, Costa Industries will not be responsible for damages resulting from use of or reliance upon this information.